Exodus Outline

Theme: Exodus means the way out, and the book is about God’s faithful provision of salvation’s deliverance to His people (1 Cor. 10:13). God’s power to save is greater than the enemy’s power to destroy; it gives birth to a covenanted people; and it calls those people to respond in reverent worship and faithful obedience.

Why study Exodus?

Whose idea was Exodus?

What is Exodus about?

  1. The need for deliverance and the provision of a deliverer (1:1-4:31).
    1. Israel’s need for deliverance (1:1-14).
      1. Israel’s need for deliverance was unknown to her in her prosperity (1:1-7).
      2. Israel’s need for deliverance was unknown to Pharaoh in his wisdom (1:8-12).
      3. Israel’s need for deliverance became known through slavery (1:13-14).
    2. The provision of a deliverer (1:15-2:10).
      1. God delivers Israel through two midwives (1:15-21).
        1. They were Hebrews (1:15a).
        2. Their names were known (1:15b).
        3. They feared God (1:16-21).
      2. God delivers Israel through Pharaoh’s daughter (1:22 – 2:10).
        1. The deliverer was the daughter of the destroyer (1:22-2:3).
        2. The deliverer was a humane person (2:4-6).
        3. The deliverer was the employer of Moses’s mother (2:7-9).
        4. The deliverer was influential for Moses’s future (2:10).
    3. The deliverer’s preparation (2:11-25).
      1. Moses made a life-changing decision (2:11-15a).
      2. Moses learned a life-regulating patience (2:15b-22).
      3. Moses’s God heard a life-saving cry (2:23-25).
    4. The deliverer’s call (3:1-4:31).
      1. God’s declaration of deliverance (3:1-10).
        1. God declares His unapproachable holiness (3:1-5).
        2. God declares His covenant to the fathers (3:6).
        3. God declares His love for those in need (3:7-9).
        4. God declares His desire to use a human instrument (3:10).
      2. Two answers for the questions of the deliverer (3:11-17).
        1. Who am I? (3:11-12).
        2. What is His name? (3:13-17).
      3. Promised provision for the deliverer (3:18-22).
        1. God provides co-laborers (3:18a).
        2. God provides the message (3:18b).
        3. God provides ultimate control over response (3:19).
        4. God provides the miracles necessary (3:20).
        5. God provides the spoils of victory (3:21-22).
      4. Exhortations for the excuses of the deliverer (4:1-17).
        1. They will not believe me (4:1-10).
          1. “I can use you to withstand the serpent” (4:1-5).
          2. “I can use you to cure the leprosy” (4:6-8).
          3. “I can use you to dethrone the idolatry” (4:9).
        2. I cannot (4:10-17).
          1. God has designed Moses’s abilities (4:10-11).
          2. God will instruct Moses what to say (4:12).
          3. God compensates for Moses’s lack of faith (4:13-17).
      5. The obedience of the deliverer (4:18-31).
        1. True obedience must be done the right way (4:18-26).
          1. Obey with the right assurance (4:18-19).
          2. Obey with the right expectation (4:20-21).
          3. Obey with appreciation for God’s love (4:22-23).
          4. Obey with reverence for God’s rules (4:24-26).
        2. True obedience can catalyze more obedience (4:27-5:2).
          1. One-another encouragement to obey (4:27-30).
          2. Leader-follower encouragement to obey (4:31-5:1).
          3. The discouragement of disobedience (5:2).
  2. The deliverance (5:1-18:27).
    1. Deliverance resisted (5:1-7:13).
      1. Deliverance is spiritual war against resistance (5:1-6:1).
        1. Satan’s arrogance is the enemy.
          1. Pharaoh views God as less than sovereign (v. 2).
          2. Pharaoh views God’s Word as less than true (vv. 9, 10).
          3. Pharaoh views God’s people with suspicion (vv. 4-18).
        2. God’s condescension is salvation.
          1. God condescends with a simple request (v. 1).
          2. God condescends with simple messengers (v. 3).
          3. God condescends with a simple explanation (5:22-6:1).
      2. Deliverance requires God in the face of resistance (6:1-8).
        1. The Lord saves completely and eternally (6:1-2).
        2. The Lord saves faithfully and compassionately (6:3-6a).
        3. The Lord saves powerfully and purposefully (6:6b-8).
      3. Deliverance requires power in the face of resistance (6:9-7:13).
        1. Man’s power is insufficient to deliver (6:9-6:27).
        2. God’s power is sufficient to deliver (6:28-7:7).
        3. Conflict between man’s power and God’s power (7:8-7:13).
    2. Deliverance irresistible (7:14-12:36).
      1. Plague one: when diplomacy ends (7:14-25).
        1. The hard heart of Pharaoh thwarts diplomacy (v. 14).
        2. God’s Word warns of the end of diplomacy (vv. 15-18).
        3. God’s hand executed the end of diplomacy (vv. 19-25).
      2. Plague two: frogs and the freedom of worship (8:1-15).
        1. Worship without political interference (vv. 1-4).
        2. Worship without religious confusion (vv. 5-11).
        3. Worship without a hard heart (vv. 12-15).
      3. Plague three: lice and the finger of God (8:16-19).
        1. The finger of God belongs to the mighty Creator (8:16-17).
        2. The finger of God belongs to the author of truth (8:18-19).
        3. The finger of God belongs to the victor over Satan (Luke 11:14-23).
      4. Plague four: the swarm that could tell the difference (8:20-32).
        1. The God whom God’s people worship is different from the gods others worship (vv. 20-21a).
        2. The ground on which God’s people stand is different from the ground others stand upon (vv. 21b-23).
        3. The worship God’s people offer their God is different from the worship of others (vv. 24-28).
        4. The grace God extends is different than the hard heart of others (vv. 29-32).
      5. Plague 5: Something heavy and someone hard (9:1-7).
        1. The heavy plague came after a gracious warning that
          someone hard refuses to obey (vv. 1-3).
        2. The heavy plague graciously promises what someone
          hard hopes to disprove (vv. 4, 6b-7a).
        3. The heavy plague graciously waits in a day during
          which someone hard refuses to change (vv. 5-6a, 7b).
      6. Plague 6: When the Lord hardens a heart (9:8-12).
        1. It is a heart that is already hardened (9:7).
        2. It is a heart that deserves to be hardened (Rom. 9:15-18).
        3. It is a heart that fulfills God’s Word (9:12).
        4. It is a heart that sins the sin for which the Lord dies (9:12).
      7. Plague 7: The heart of the matter (9:13-35).
        1. God’s purpose for Pharaoh – glorify God (vv. 13-16).
        2. Pharaoh’s purpose for Pharaoh – self-exaltation (vv. 17-18).
        3. God’s treatment of Pharaoh – merciful (vv. 19-26, 31-33).
        4. Pharaoh’s treatment of Pharaoh – destructive (vv. 27-30, 34-35).
      8. Plague 8: Locusts eat away Pharaoh’s lies (10:1-20).
        1. Pharaoh believed the lie that he need not bow (vv. 1-7).
        2. Pharaoh believed the lie that he knew best (vv. 7-11).
        3. Pharaoh believed the lie that his false repentance could save him (vv. 12-20).
      9. Plague 9: Pharaoh’s darkness (10:21-29).
        1. The total removal of visible light (vv. 21-23).
        2. Materialism (vv. 24-26a).
        3. Self-made religion (vv. 26b-29).
      10. Plague 10: the fall of Egypt (11:1-10, 12:29-36).
        1. Powerfully executed by the Lord (11:1, 9-10).
        2. Faithfully proclaimed by Moses (11:2-8).
        3. Tragically destroyed her people (12:29-33).
        4. Frees her slaves (12:34-36).
    3. Deliverance executed (12:1-28, 12:37-13:22).
      1. The Passover is instituted (12:1-28).
        1. Christ, our Passover sacrifice (12:1-11, 21-22).
          1. A new creation (v. 2).
          2. An innocent victim (vv. 3-7, 21-22).
          3. A menu for participation (vv. 8-10).
          4. An exodus anticipation (v. 11).
        2. Christ, our Passover propitiation (12:12-13, 23).
          1. The problem solved is the Lord (vv. 12, 23a).
          2. The solution provided is the blood (vv. 13a, 23b).
          3. The power executed saves the house (vv. 13b, 23c).
        3. Christianity, our Passover commission (12:14-20, 24-28).
          1. Unchanging from one generation to another (vv. 14, 17b, 24-27).
          2. An assembly with a twofold mission (vv. 16, 19).
          3. No tolerance for leaven (vv. 15, 17-20).
          4. Requires obedience (v. 28).
      2. God leads His newborn people (12:37-51, 13:17-22).
        1. With special provisions (12:37-42).
        2. With a special identity (12:43-51).
        3. With special love (13:17-22).
      3. Blessings of the firstborn (13:1-16).
        1. They are blessed with holiness (13:1-4).
        2. They are blessed with a personal relationship (13:5-16).
        3. They are blessed with an inheritance (13:5-12).
        4. They are blessed with redemption (13:13-16).
    4. Deliverance irreversible (14:1-31).
      1. Can God’s salvation fail? (14:1-14).
        1. Remember God’s purpose when it seems so (14:1-8).
        2. Accept God’s challenge when it seems so (14:9-14).
      2. God’s salvation never fails (14:15-31).
        1. God split the seas; He did not fail (vv. 15-16, 21-22).
        2. God hardened the Egyptians; He did not fail (vv. 17-18, 23).
        3. God used the pillar; He did not fail (vv. 19-20, 24-28).
        4. God caused Israel to believe; He did not fail (vv. 29-31).
    5. Deliverance celebrated (15:1-21).
      1. Moses’s song tells us about his singing (vv. 1-2, 20-21).
      2. Moses’s song tells us about his God (vv. 3-8).
      3. Moses’s song tells us about his enemies (vv. 9-12, 14-16).
      4. Moses’s song tells us about his future (vv. 13, 17-19).
    6. Deliverance lamented (15:22-17:7).
      1. The truth about our troubles (15:22-27).
      2. Flesh for fleshly complainers (16:1-13).
      3. Lessons from the bread from heaven (16:14-36).
      4. “Is the Lord among us or not?” (17:1-7).
    7. Deliverance blessed (17:8-18:27).
      1. The Lord is our banner for battle (17:8-16).
        1. For battles that are ongoing (v. 8).
        2. For battles that are won with the rod (vv. 9-11).
        3. For battles that are won together (vv. 12-13).
        4. For battles that must be won by each generation (vv. 14-16).
      2. Jethro: the encouraging listener (18:1-12).
        1. Jethro heard that God had redeemed His people (v. 1).
        2. Jethro heard that God’s people had a need (vv. 2-7).
        3. Jethro heard that God is always good (vv. 8-9).
        4. Jethro heard that God is greater than all gods (vv. 10-12).
      3. Jethro: the encouraging counselor (18:13-27).
        1. The need – a good thing done in a bad way (vv. 13-18).
        2. The solution – more laborers in the harvest field (vv. 19-23).
        3. The response – water drawn up from the well (vv. 24-27).
  3. The life of the delivered (19:1-40:38).
    1. A covenantal life (19:1-25).
      1. Life under the love of the Lord’s covenant (19:1-8).
        1. In love, the Lord initiates the covenant (vv. 1-4).
        2. In love, the Lord explains the covenant (vv. 5-6).
        3. In love, the Lord accounts for His people’s response to His covenant (vv. 7-8).
      2. Life under the holiness of the Lord’s covenant (19:9-25).
        1. The people climb to get to the foot of Sinai (vv. 10-17).
        2. The Lord descends to get to the peak of Sinai (vv. 18-20a).
        3. The people need Moses and Aaron to go up and down Sinai for them (vv. 9, 20b-25).
    2. A lawful life (20:1-24:18).
      1. Introduction to God’s law.
        1. The life of the redeemed is a lawful life (Ps. 119:97-104).
        2. The lawful life is a loving life (Exod. 20:6).
      2. The Ten Commandments (20:1-17).
        1. “There shall be no other gods belonging to you” (20:1-3).
          1. The Lord, not other gods, must command us (v. 1).
          2. The Lord, not other gods, must save us (v. 2).
          3. The Lord, not other gods, must be my God (v. 3).
      3. The mediator’s “fear not” (20:18-26).
      4. Civil law for the nation of Israel (21:1-23:33).
        1. Masters and slaves (21:1-11).
        2. Assault and battery (21:12-36).
        3. Thievery and societal moral decay (22:1-23:9).
        4. National holy days (23:10-19).
        5. National defense and conquest (23:20-33).
      5. The ratification of the covenant (24:1-8).
      6. The glory of the covenant (24:9-18).
    3. A worshipping life (25:1-40:38).
      1. Worship designed by God (25:1-31:18).
      2. Worship counterfeited by man (32:1-33:23).
      3. Worship renewed in revival (34:1-40:38).